Editorial: The Greyhound’s online presence

The Greyhound is now, for the most part, an online paper. We made this change in earnest in the spring semester last year by posting our content to thegreyhound.org instead of printing it. Some people were fine with this change, and others were upset, but that’s fine.

People have different preferences and opinions. But the sad fact about our transition to online publication is that, to many Loyola students, The Greyhound just dropped off the face of the earth.

As an editor, you never want to hear a freshman say “wait, we have a newspaper?” In fact, that’s much of the reason why we’re printing this first issue of the semester. We work hard on the content we publish on paper and online, and we really want you to read it. But we also understand that’s hard to expect if you as a reader are kept out of the loop with respect to our publication—so let’s break it down

The Greyhound is primarily an online publication. Content is posted continuously throughout the week on thegreyhound.org. Printing a newspaper is very costly and, for a staff of our size with out resources, issuing daily would be impossible. But we have no such problem online. Publishing an article on thegreyhound.org costs nothing for us. If something goes down on campus we can cover it as fast as it happens, with as many words as it takes.

We understand that finding The Greyhound online isn’t as easy as grabbing a bundle of paper left around campus, but we’ve also made sure you won’t have to constantly refresh thegreyhound.org to get the scoop. By following @loyolagreyhound on Twitter, new articles and content will appear directly on your feed as we post them.

Print isn’t gone though. We’re printing this week, and we will issue special print editions from time to time when a story calls for it.

We love your feedback. Send a letter to the editor to [email protected] with any thoughts you might have about The Greyhound’s transition to the web. We’re always looking into ways to make thegreyhound.org not just an alternative to printing, but a standalone daily experience.

Mike Ebmeier
Opinions Editor